DATA

THE PROS:

Alternative Apparel factories are in accordance with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) Workplace Code of Conduct and many are also certified by Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production.

There is a public list of countries of first, second and raw material suppliers and for this reason it is inferred that the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

65% of Alternative Apparel’s garments are made from sustainable materials.

THE CONS:

Alternative Apparel does not share a public list of suppliers’ names and addresses.

It is unclear if the code of conduct applies to multiple levels of the supply chain.

The brand communicates limited information about its social and environmental impact.

/ The brand has 4 stores.

/ According to an interview with the founder, Greg Alterman, in 2013, the brand has reached $100 million in sales and they have 180 employees.

/ We don’t have any information about: number of suppliers, lead times, the number of garments produced annually, the number of collections released annually and how long their products are designed to last.

/ There is a public list of countries of first, second and raw material suppliers and for this reason it is inferred that the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ Alternative Apparel does not share a public list of suppliers’ names and addresses.

/ The brand communicates limited information about its social and environmental impact.

 

/ Alternative Apparel factories are in accordance with the Fair Labor Association (FLA) Workplace Code and many are also certified by Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production.

/ The Fair Labor Association Workplace Code requires employers to pay at least the minimum wage or the appropriate prevailing wage, whichever is higher. It also states that when compensation does not meet workers’ basic needs and provide some discretionary income, employers shall work with the FLA to take appropriate actions that seek to progressively realize a level of compensation that does. It is unclear if Alternative Apparel pays minimum wages or higher.

/ It is unclear if the code applies to multiple levels of the supply chain.

/ 65% of Alternative Apparel’s garments are made from sustainable materials.

/ The brand uses organic cotton, modal, alpaca wool and linen.

/ Alternative Apparel uses natural dyes and non-toxic, low impact dyes on their sustainable fabrics.

/ The brand uses the G2 Eco-Wash to age and break in their garments. This wash saves 60% in energy and water versus traditional finishing methods.

/ The brand is a certified Green Business, a designation given by the City of Los Angeles. The Green Business certification focuses on: reducing waste, recycling, reusing materials, reducing energy usage, reducing water usage, and wastewater management. We don’t have information if these efforts apply to the rest of the supply chain.

 

/ Alternative Apparel is aiming to use a higher proportion of sustainable materials in their collection.

 

We don’t have any information about whether or not Alternative Apparel are involved in any multi stakeholder or CSR initiatives.

 

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO made in the last financial year.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

/ The brand uses the G2 Eco-Wash to age and break in their garments. This wash saves 60% in energy and water versus traditional finishing methods.

VOICES

OLIVIA WILDE | VOGUE

“I’ve been trying to figure out how to combine conscious commerce with my love for fashion,” explains Wilde, who chose to work with Alternative Apparel, the Atlanta-based label committed to ethically and environmentally responsible production practices, because “I wear their sweatshirts every day and live in their maxidresses. And they’re good people!” – 6/27/2012

 


JESSICA MARATI | ECO-SALON

“If Alternative Apparel truly wants to design clothing for “free-thinking people,” it should be prepared when those people ask questions and hold the company accountable for its practices. At the very least, Alternative Apparel should back up its eco-branding with open, honest information about where its products come from.” – 7/12/2012

 

“There’s a commitment to the sustainability aspect—regardless if that’s something the customer is interested in, we’re committed to it.” – Orondava Mumford, Design Director, Cool Hunting, 01/02/2014