DATA

THE PROS:

The brand communicates their mission as:

  • “Our mission from day one was to not only create unique, quality kidswear but to also support organizations making a substantial difference in the lives of kids around the world. We believe all kids, regardless of race, gender, religion, or country of origin, should have the same opportunities and the right to just be kids. Unfortunately, that’s not the case in many parts of our world.”

The brand produces exclusively in the US, specifically in California and has shared a list of suppliers names and addresses.

The brand only uses deadstock/surplus fabrics, which are materials that would have otherwise ended up in landfills. The brand communicates that “instead of sitting in a landfill, we take fabric leftover from other fashion brands, mills, or garment factories that otherwise would be thrown away and make sweet threads for your wild child.”

THE CONS:

The brand doesn’t have a code of conduct. However, the brand produces at a factory in their same city (LA), they visit the factory frequently, and have a strong relationship with the owner.

The brand has interviewed the owner of the factory, and some highlights are:

  • Employees don’t work on contract, the owner believes this gives his workers the flexibility to leave if they have better work opportunities.

 

/ The brand sells its products online on their website and through pop-up shops.

/ The brand communicates their mission as: “Our mission from day one was to not only create unique, quality kidswear but to also support organizations making a substantial difference in the lives of kids around the world. We believe all kids, regardless of race, gender, religion, or country of origin, should have the same opportunities and the right to just be kids. Unfortunately, that’s not the case in many parts of our world.”

/ The brand has 5 suppliers, and 25 people working in their supply chain.

/ The brand has made 1500 garments since its inception in July 2015.

/ Regarding the lifetime of their products, the brand communicates that they only use very high quality fabrics and produces at a factory that has a strong record for quality.

/ The brand produces exclusively in the US, specifically in California.

/ The brand shared a list of suppliers names and addresses.

/ The brand uses deadstock material, therefore we are not sure if it is able to trace its supply chain beyond the fabric level.

/ The brand communicates that they give 10% of their profits to nonprofits that support children’s education and extracurricular activities.

/ The brand doesn’t have a code of conduct. However, the brand produces at a factory in their same city (LA), they visit the factory frequently, and have a strong relationship with the owner.

/ The brand communicates that their partner factory are dedicated to eco-friendly manufacturing practices and to providing a safe and fair work environment for all of their employees.

/ The brand has interviewed the owner of the factory, and some highlights are:

  • Employees work from 8am to 430pm, with three breaks during the day.
  • Employees don’t work on contract, the owner believes this gives his workers the flexibility to leave if they have better work opportunities.
  • The factory pays above the LA minimum wage; $10/hr for new employees and $14/hr for experiences employees. The minimum wage in LA is $9/hr.
  • If the factory has a very large order, they pay their employees overtime or hire more people. Overtime is paid a time and a half and would be 7am – 5:30pm.

 

/ The brand only uses deadstock/surplus fabrics, which are materials that would have otherwise ended up in landfills. The brand communicates that “instead of sitting in a landfill, we take fabric leftover from other fashion brands, mills, or garment factories that otherwise would be thrown away and make sweet threads for your wild child.”.

/ The brand doesn’t have any policies to protect animal welfare, such policies don’t apply to their brand as they don’t use any animal products.

/ At this time, the brand doesn’t have a take back program for their clothing. The brand started selling products in July 2015.

/ The brand made a commitment to produce domestically, and never to produce at a factory where employees are not making a living wage or being treated with dignity and respect.

/ The brand gives 10% of its profits to projects that support children’s education and extracurricular activities in East Africa. The brand communicates their mission as the following: “We’re doing what we can to contribute to established organizations that focus their projects on children’s education and extracurricular activities in East Africa. 10% of profits from every Beru sale are donated to worthy causes that are doing just this. Keep an eye on us as we grow as we hope to expand to other regions and places.

 

/ The brand is founded by Sofia Melograno.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

/ The brand only uses deadstock/surplus fabrics, which are materials that would have otherwise ended up in landfills. The brand communicates that “instead of sitting in a landfill, we take fabric leftover from other fashion brands, mills, or garment factories that otherwise would be thrown away and make sweet threads for your wild child.”

VOICES

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“I’ve always had an interest in ethical fashion and knew that I wanted to start a kid’s line that was more than just adorable, quality apparel. I wanted to start a line of beautiful, unique kidswear and not at the expense of others or the environment. My goal from day one was to create clothing that told a story parents and kids could connect with and feel good about supporting.” – Sofia Melograno, Founder of Beru Kids