DATA

THE PROS:

Through its Lean Closet initiative, Cuyana encourages shoppers to buy fewer clothing items of better quality.

In January 2016, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Cuyana ‘work with skilled craftspeople around the world rather than outsourcing cheap labor, have kept design in-house, and have cut out the middleman in order to deliver premium products directly to consumers at accessible price points.’

The brand appears to only use natural materials.

THE CONS:

It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain. Do you know of any?

We don’t have any information on how the brand monitors its supply chain.

/ Cuyana has a store in Los Angeles and a showroom in San Francisco, and retails online.

/ In January 2016, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that the brand secured $1.7 million in seed funding in 2013.

/ The brand describes its philosophy as “fewer, better”. They say ”we believe that fewer, better things lead to a fuller, better life.”

/ We don’t have any information on how many employees the brand has, how many people the brand employ in its supply chain, how many suppliers the brand uses, annual revenue, lead times, the number of garments made annually, and how many collections the brand releases annually.

 

/ It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ The brand does not publicly disclose the countries in which its suppliers are located or the supplier names and addresses.

/ The brand does not report its sustainability practices and progress annually.

 

/ Cuyana states that it consolidated its production so it all happens in one country. We don’t have any further information on this.

/ The brand states the following: “We travel the world to search for the finest materials for our products. We find the best suppliers who have generations of experience working with the materials. The level of craftsmanship and expertise of our suppliers is something that we take great pride in.” We don’t have any further information on where and how these materials are sourced.

/ In January 2016, the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Cuyana ‘work with skilled craftspeople around the world rather than outsourcing cheap labor, have kept design in-house, and have cut out the middleman in order to deliver premium products directly to consumers at accessible price points.’

/ In February 2015, NYMag reported that ‘the partners personally travel to seek out materials abroad and work with local cut-and-sews. Once they’ve chosen a country, they source and produce in the same place instead of outsourcing work.’

/ We don’t have any other information about how Cuyana manages the social conditions and practices in its supply chain.

/ In June 2013, Cuyana launched Lean Closet. With every Cuyana purchase, where a shopper selects “lean shipping” at checkout, the brand will send a reusable bag to fill up with items that the shopper no longer needs. The shopper mails the bag back to Cuyana (with the included shipping label). The brand has partnered with the non-profit organization, H.E.A.R.T., to donate the clothing directly to women who need the it.

/ Through its Lean Closet initiative, Cuyana encourages shoppers to buy fewer clothing items of better quality.

/ The brand appears to only use natural materials.

/ We don’t have any information on whether or not the brand uses renewable energy at any stage of its supply chain, if the brand has measured its carbon footprint, what the brand is doing to reduce its carbon footprint, if the brand has measured the water footprint of its supply chain, what the brand is doing to reduce its water footprint, what the brand is doing to ensure the proper treatment of water before it is returned to local waterways, and policies that are in place to limit the use of hazardous chemicals.

/ We don’t have any information on policies in place to reduce pollution and resources used for transport, whether or not the brand has a sustainable packaging policy, and waste management policies.

 

/ The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain. Do you know of any?

/ The brand does not publicly disclose that it is a part of any multi stakeholder initiatives to improve the social and environmental impact of its supply chain.

 

/ On Cyber Monday in 2013, Cuyana matched donations made through its site, up to $500 total, to UNICEF’s disaster relief program that provided aid for families in the Philippines who had been affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO, Karla Gallardo, made in the last financial year.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

 

/ In June 2013, Cuyana launched Lean Closet. With every Cuyana purchase, where a shopper selects “lean shipping” at checkout, the brand will send a reusable bag to fill up with items that the shopper no longer needs. The shopper mails the bag back to Cuyana (with the included shipping label). The brand has partnered with the non-profit organisation, H.E.A.R.T., to donate the clothing directly to women who need it.

/ Through its Lean Closet initiative, Cuyana encourages shoppers to buy less clothing items and buy quality.

 

VOICES

LORI KEONG | THE CUT

“The theory is limiting the selection of items helps women to think about their wardrobes in terms of the long game, hopefully eschewing fast-fashion whim purchases for these items that are made to last.” – 02/04/2015


 

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