DATA

THE PROS:

EDUN states that it is building long-term, sustainable growth opportunities by supporting manufacturers, community-based initiatives and partnering with African artists and artisans.

The brand releases 4 collections annually.

THE CONS:

Edun does not communicate any information on its website concerning environmental practices or impacts.

We don’t have any information about how Edun monitors its supply chain.

The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain.

/ Edun does not have any branded stores. The brand is stocked at 20 brick and mortar retailers and 7 online retailers.

/ The brand releases 4 collections annually.

/ We don’t have any information on how many employees the brand has at its stores, distribution centers and head offices, how many people the brand employs in its supply chain, how many suppliers the brand uses, annual revenue, lead times, the number of garments made annually, and how long its products are designed to last.

/ It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ The brand does not publicly disclose supplier names and addresses.

/ The brand does not report annually on sustainability practices and progress.

/ The brand does not communicate the social impact of its supply chain.

/ The brand does not communicate the environmental impact of its supply chain.

/ EDUN states that it is building long-term, sustainable growth opportunities by supporting manufacturers, community-based initiatives and partnering with African artists and artisans.

/ The brand does not have a publicly available supplier code of conduct.

/ We don’t have any information about how Edun monitors its supply chain.

/ In June 2015, 1 Granary magazine reported that 95% of Edun’s collection is produced in Africa in factories in Nairobi, Kenya and Madagascar.

/ In June 2013, Ecouterre reported that Diesel and Edun were collaborating on a collection to promote apparel trade and development in Africa. The 25-piece collection was sourced and made entirely in Africa using CCI cotton from Uganda.

/ Edun does not communicate any information on its website concerning environmental practices or impacts.

/ In November 2012, Ecouterre reported that Edun had collaborated with Matt Bernson to repurpose Edun’s leftover textiles into shoes. The shoes were made from African tenting canvas, along with brushed-metal circle pulls made by artisans in Kenya’s Bombalulu workshop.

/ The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain. Do you know of any?

/ The brand does not publicly disclose that it is a part of any recent multi stakeholder initiatives to improve the social and environmental impact of its supply chain.

/ In November 2015, Ecouterre reported that Edun had collaborated with J.Crew’s children’s division to create a line of children’s clothing. The collection is part of J.Crew’s “Garments for Good” initiative, and features exclusive, made-in-Kenya designs, including a T-shirt that benefits St. Ann’s Orphanage in Gilgil, a town in Nakuru County. 50% of the retail price was donated to the orphanage.

/ In September 2010, Ecouterre reported that Edun collaborated with Louis Vuitton to create a limited edition travel bag. The bag included a handcrafted ebony-and-bone charm by Made, a fair-trade brand of jewelry and accessories crafted by the people of Kenya. All proceeds from the sale of the bag were reported to go to TechnoServe in Uganda to support the Conservation Cotton Initiative.

/ In April 2010, Ecouterre reported that Edun had collaborated with Sephora to release the EDUN for Sephora Palettes, a pair of limited edition, Baobab oil-enriched color assortments for the eyes and cheeks. The palettes were reportedly fairly made to support sustainable trade. $3 from every sale went to the Wildlife Conservation Society to fund the Conservation Cotton Initiative in Uganda.

/ LVMH owns a 49% minority stake of Edun.

/ In February 2012, Ecouterre reported that Edun had received criticism for going against its mission and moving some of its production to cheaper facilities in China as a result of a reported $11 million in debt.

/ In September 2010, Huffington Post criticized Bono and Edun for moving production to China. The article reported that “Edun’s high profile failure to produce goods in Africa is devastating to the brand of Africa.”

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO, Janice Sullivan, made in the last financial year.

/ Edun is a privately owned brand.

/ TechnoServe reports that with support from Edun the organization is working with 8,500 cotton farmers in northern Uganda where farms had been abandoned as a result of civil conflict. The Conservation Cotton Initiative (CCI) aims to improve farmers’ cotton incomes by encouraging the adoption of better agronomic and post-harvest practices, and linking farmers to better markets. The program aims to increase and enhance the competitiveness of the country’s overall cotton sector.

 

As of December 2013, the Conservation Cotton Initiative has registered and organized more than 8,500 farmers into 150 farmer business groups and helped them generate more than $1 million in staple crop sales. In addition, the program has assisted more than 300 farmers in accessing loans worth $77,465 and 250 entrepreneurs in generating $93,000 by providing agricultural support services. CCI participants have drilled 12 new boreholes in their communities.

We don’t have any recent information on this initiative.

VOICES

LAUREN SHERMAN | THE BUSINESS OF FASHION business of fashion logo

“The trials and tribulations of Edun are well documented. Like many brands that initially put an altruistic mission front and centre, instead of first showcasing the design, it’s been an uphill battle to find a dedicated following. Since installing Sherman in 2013 — the third creative director since its founding in 2005 — the company has managed to find a place on the racks of the right retailers, from Net-a-Porter to Barneys New York and The Line. However, the designer has been criticised for taking what’s in the air and referencing it a bit too directly.” – 12/21/2015


1GranaryJEPPE UGELVIG | 1 GRANARY

EDUN is the living proof that for social and environmental sustainability to go beyond its status as superficial marketing-tool, it must be incorporated and rooted in the very centre of a business.” – 6/15/2015

 


AethicAETHIC

Unfortunately there is no precise information to find, that gives practical proof of what is generally described on the website as a philosophy of ethical values. We can only assume that the workers are paid a living wage and that the projects and collaborations with jewelry artisans are fruitful, too. At least the travel pictures on the website promise so.” – 11/26/2015