DATA

ELVIS & KRESSE HAS BEEN JUST APPROVED™ JUST SYMBOL - BLACK FOR HANDBAGS & LEATHER+

THE PROS:

Elvis & Kresse reports that 95% of its products are made in its own workshops which are open for anyone to visit at anytime.

The brand uses reclaimed materials to make its products, including fire hoses, flawed parachute silk, off-set printing blankets, leather scraps, coffee sacks and auction banners.

Elvis & Kresse states that it monitors and reports on its annual energy usage, and that it is powered by Bulb, a renewable energy supplier certified B Corp, so 100% of the energy used at its headquarters and main workshop are from renewable sources.

THE CONS:

Elvis & Kresse currently do not have sources for reclaimed thread or zippers.

Elvis & Kresse are working on eliminating plastic from their delivery system, but have not solved the plastic courier pouch problem yet.

 

/ Elvis & Kresse retails through its own online store, and at 20 stores in 12 countries.

/ All Elvis & Kresse products are made from reclaimed materials. The brand states its design process begins with a problem, and that it is the material and the scale of the problem which dictates what the brand makes and how it makes it.

/ Elvis & Kresse products are designed to last for a very long time, and the brand reports that it is always happy to repair items to extend their life.

/ The brand’s lead times can be 5-6 weeks for orders in excess of 200 units of one item.

/ 50% of the profits from the brand’s fire hose range are donated to the Fire Fighters Charity (FFC), Elvis & Kresse practices open-book accounting with the FFC.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that it operates a workshop in Istanbul, Turkey, in co-operation with a Turkish partner.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that the average tenure of its relationships with its suppliers is more than 61 months.

/ Elvis & Kresse states that it reports on its sustainability progress continually throughout the year. We don’t have any further information on this.

/ Elvis & Kresse runs its workshop transparently, so anyone can visit, anytime, and the brand does open-book accounting with its stakeholder partners.

/ The brand does not publicly disclose supplier names and addresses.

 

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that all of its external suppliers are SA8000 certified or higher.

/ The brand states that 95% of its products are made in its own workshops which are open for anyone to visit at anytime.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that 30%+ (the highest category) of its workers are employed in facilities in low-income communities.

/ The brand states that all of its products are hand-made.

/ In September 2016, Huffington Post reported that Elvis & Kresse runs an apprenticeship program for young people in their Kent workshop that pays above the living wage.

Elvis & Kresse measures itself against the amount of material it reclaims, and its annual donations, in order to determine if it is achieving its social and environmental objectives.

/ Elvis & Kresse uses reclaimed materials to make its products, including fire hoses, flawed parachute silk, off-set printing blankets, leather scraps, coffee sacks and auction banners.

Elvis & Kresse has also decided to tackle the world’s 800,000 tonne a year leather waste problem by creating a system of shapes which are handwoven to effectively make new hide which can be made into any size or shape. It is currently working with FLOR to produce rugs and upholstery using this material.

/ Elvis & Kresse states that it monitors and reports on its annual energy usage, and that it is powered by Bulb, a renewable energy supplier certified B Corp, so 100% of the energy used at itsheadquarters and main workshop are from renewable sources.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that it collects unwanted shoe boxes, flattens them and uses the material to make its packaging and labels. The brand also uses tea sacks, tea bag paper, coffee sacks, Air Traffic Control Flight Strips, Parachute silk and end-of-line labels.

/ In May 2010, the Guardian reported that Elvis & Kresse had been working with British wastes since 2005 and more than 10 waste streams are used to create their range of bags, belts and wallets. They are constantly searching for more materials to reclaim and have saved over 150 tonnes from landfill.

 

/ Elvis & Kresse states that it monitors and records its water usage and has specific reduction targets. Elvis & Kresse both limits its water use and treats its own waste-water in order to preserve surrounding water sources. We have no information on what these targets are.

/ Elvis & Kresse states that life cycle considerations are taken into account designing products. The brand has not undertaken any formal life cycle assessment.

/ In 2016, Elvis & Kresse was certified as a founding UK B Corp.

 

/ Through an initiative in which Elvis & Kresse made shopping bags for Sainsbury’s from old coffee sacks, the brand has made donations to CafeDirect, the Costa Foundation, David Williamson Rwanda Foundation, Bettys and Taylors and Union Hand Roasted. In working with The Costa Foundation the brand has supported two coffee grower initiatives, one to build a spent domestic water filtration system at Jesus Maria in Nicaragua and the other to construct accommodation, kitchens and lavatories at Santa Ana La Huerta in Guatemala.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that it re-distributes up to 50% of profits to projects and charities related to the materials it reclaims, and that 50% of the profits from the fire hose range are donated to the Fire Fighters Charity. The brand has also donated to WWF, Help for Heroes, Comic Relief, and British Forces Foundation.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that it supports a prisoner training program where prisoners are engaged in making its packaging. The prisoners choose to work (it is absolutely voluntary) and they are paid.

/ Elvis & Kresse measures itself against the amount of material it reclaims, and its annual donations, in order to determine if it is achieving its social and environmental objectives.

Elvis & Kresse has been awarded the Butterfly Mark, awarded by Positive Luxury to lifestyle brands who take pride in their craftsmanship, service and design whilst caring for their employees and suppliers, and working hard to protect the planet’s people and resources.

In June 2012, Walpole chose Elvis & Kresse to be one of its Brands of Tomorrow, a selection of young brands that are chosen by Walpole to represent the future of British luxury.

 

/ Elvis & Kresse uses reclaimed materials to make its products, including fire hoses, flawed parachute silk, off-set printing blankets, leather, coffee sacks and auction banners.

/ Elvis & Kresse has also decided to tackle the world’s 800,000 tonne a year leather waste problem by creating a system of shapes which are handwoven to effectively make new hide which can be made into any size or shape. It is currently working with FLOR to produce rugs and upholstery using this material.

/ Elvis & Kresse reports that it collects unwanted shoe boxes, flattens them and uses the material to make its packaging and labels. The brand also uses tea sacks, tea bag paper, coffee sacks, Air Traffic Control Flight Strips, Parachute silk and end-of-line labels.

/ Elvis & Kresse states that it monitors and reports on its annual energy usage, and that it is powered by Bulb, a renewable energy supplier and B Corp member, so 100% of the energy used at its corporate facilities is from renewable sources.

/ In 2016, Elvis & Kresse was certified as a founding UK B Corp.

VOICES

EMMA SINCLAIR | THE TELEGRAPH

“She doesn’t see the point of a business that isn’t meant to make the world better or isn’t designed to create solutions. That is why she started with hose.” – 07/08/2013


 

KRESSE WESLING, FOUNDER | THE GUARDIAN

I’m now entrepreneur in residence at the Said School in Oxford, and one of the students asked me the other day if I feel as if I can relax now. No! I feel as if we’re only just getting started. At the moment we’re only diverting a tiny fraction of the UK’s waste stream from landfill, and I lie awake at nights trying to think of ways of diverting more. We need, we urgently need to change people, to change the way people value our environment.” – 05/15/2014

KRESSE WESLING, FOUNDER | BUSINESS SHAPERS

We started this business really as a response to landfill. We didn’t want lovely materials languishing in the dirt.” – 01/16/2016