DATA

THE PROS:

Everlane shares stories and photographs of their first tier and some of their second tier suppliers.

Everlane shares a breakdown of the cost of some of its products with its customers in order to demonstrate what the brand terms radical transparency.

The brand was ranked #24 in Fast Company’s list of the World’s 50 Most Innovative Companies 2016 for “matching our clothes to our values.”

THE CONS:

Everlane does not publicly share any information about specific environmental policies.

It is unclear if the brand can trace their entire supply chain.

Everlane does not share publicly what it is doing to improve the environmental and social impact of its supply chain.

/ Everlane only retails through its online store apart from occasional pop-ups.

/ The brand has 16 suppliers listed on its website. This number does not include raw material suppliers.

/ Everlane estimates that it has over 10,000 factory workers around the world.

/ The brand’s tee and sweatshirt factory produces over 20,000 tees a month.

/ In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that Everlane’s sales in 2013 were $12 million and $24 million in 2014. PrivCo, a firm that tracks private companies, estimates Everlane’s revenue could be $35 million in 2015. Everlane no longer shares sales information publicly.

/ In October 2015, Racked reported that in the last 12 months, Everlane had sold almost 30,000 pairs of shoes.

 

/ Everlane shares a map of where its first and second tier suppliers are located however the brand does not publicly share a list of its suppliers names and addresses. In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that Everlane says it doesn’t publish the names of its factories on its website for competitive reasons.

/ The brand shares stories and photographs of its first tier and some of its second tier suppliers.

/ We reached out to the brand with questions about its social and environmental impact as those weren’t available on its site. The brand responded within a couple of days. The correspondence can be accessed here and here.

/ In response to our question about how it ensure that the brand’s suppliers treat their workers and the environment fairly, the brand stated that it has a Code of Conduct and a semi­-annual rigorous auditing system. Everlane briefly describes the auditing system in the correspondence, but does not share the code of conduct.

/ It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

 

/ In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that in 2014, workers from the Dongguan factory that Everlane sources from went on strike, demanding that the manager be fired for berating them. After two days, the workers gathered outside the executive’s office and wouldn’t let him leave. He didn’t agree to fire the manager, but promised she would treat them better and offered to pay them for one day’s work.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Everlane states that all of its factories abide by standards set by the International Labor Organization.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Everlane stated that its workers at the brand’s factories are paid, on average, a higher wage than their peers but due to confidentiality agreements with vendors Everlane is unable to disclose how much this is.

/ In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that Everlane has tried to customize its audits so it gets information about median wages, the highest and lowest salaries, and how those break down by gender. The brand asks if the dorms have hot water, heating and air conditioning.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Everlane states that each factory is subject to a semi-annual audit by a third-party company, with this visit focusing in on Everlane’s 13 compliancy standards. Additionally, each vendor is subject to quarterly unannounced audits that focus primarily on the brand’s zero tolerance policies. It is unclear what the 13 standards are.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Everlane states that any animal-sourced material is never harvested using methods that harm the animals involved.

/ Everlane does not publicly share any information about specific environmental policies.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Everlane states that in terms of the environmental impact of its products, the brand requires factories to abide by all local, regional, and international regulations.

 

 

 

 

/ Everlane does not publicly share any goals to improve its environmental impact.

A profile on Everlane in Fast Company’s list of Most Innovative Companies of 2016 mentions that the brand plans to introduce a factory rating system.

/ In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that in the spring of 2015, Everlane hired an auditor to inspect its factories, focusing on safety and health requirements, as well as workers’ wages and quality of life. The Dongguan factory that Everlane sourced from had the worst score of the five factories in China that were audited. Everlane wants to post audit scores and update its line of bags, so the brand has been looking for alternatives to the Dongguan factory.

 

/ In 2014 the brand raised funds for the Rana Plaza Donors Trust Fund, matching every dollar donated by customers up to $10,000.

 

/ We do not have any information on how much the CEO was paid in the last financial year. Do you?

/ There have been no reported management issues.

/ In December 2015, Bloomberg reported that in May 2014, Everlane’s Dongguan factory shipped almost 1,000 Everlane backpacks with the strap buckles on backward, and they went out to customers without anyone noticing. The company had to recall the bags.

/ Everlane shares a breakdown of the cost of each product with its customers in order to demonstrate what the brand terms radical transparency.

/ The brand shares stories and photographs of their first tier and some of their second tier suppliers.

/ The brand was ranked #24 in Fast Company’s list of the World’s 50 Most Innovative Companies 2016 for “matching our clothes to our values.”

VOICES

SUCHARITA MULPURUBloomberg AS QUOTED BY SUSAN BERFIELD | BLOOMBERG

“They have a missionary, not mercenary, approach to their business.” – 12/02/2015

 

 


CHAVIE LIEBE | RACKED

‘Jeff Trexler, the associate director of Fordham’s Fashion Law Institute, notes brands like H&M and Forever 21 have touted more ethical initiatives as of late….. “All of this is in direct response to Everlane’s presence,” Trexler posits. “Everlane has photos of smiling employees and clean factories abroad, and they are putting pressure on brands to follow suit, because otherwise it looks like they are hiding something.”‘

“But for all its talk of transparency, Everlane is extremely tightlipped about internal goings-on. Preysman was the only Everlane employee offered up for this story, and no one from the design or creative teams was made available to be interviewed. Repeated requests to visit the brand’s New York office were declined.” – 10/8/2015


RYAN CALDBECK | FORBES

“Their website isn’t just about business—it’s about how they do business. You see their factories; you see their stories. You learn why they chose the factories they chose; you learn when they last visited the factories, and you learn who owns them.” – 4/24/2015

 

 

“We constantly challenge the status quo. Nothing is worse than complacency, and as a brand our culture is to dissect every single decision we make at every level of the company.” Everlane website

We reached out to the brand with questions about their social and environmental impact as those weren’t available on their site. The brand responded within a couple of days. The correspondence can be accessed here and here.