DATA

THE PROS:

Glass House shirt makers sells a range of products made from dead-stock materials, organic cotton, lyocell and tencel, recycled polyester and hemp.

Glass House shirt makers reports that it carbon offsets all packages sent from its warehouse.

The brand uses leftover material to manufacture pocket squares or scarves as new products. All accessories are made from scrap fabrics from production of shirts.

Glass House shirt makers reports it considers the social impact of its supply chain by manufacturing in United States factories, and visits these regularly, so that it knows the sewers and the environments they work in.

THE CONS:

Glass House shirt makers reports it is unable to trace its entire supply chain at this time, as some of its suppliers are unwilling to share this information.

 

/ Glass House shirt makers was founded by Daniel Bernardo in 2011 and makes tailored, high quality mens button up shirts. The brand aims to be conscious in everything it does.

/ Glass House shirt makers retails through its own online store, and 10 boutique retailers across the United States.

/ Glass House shirt makers uses 7 suppliers and reports there are 100’s of employees throughout its supply chain.

/ Glass House shirt makers products are designed to last 10 years minimum.

/ The brand’s business model is based on the Triple Bottom Line strategy, People, Planet and Prosperity.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports its fabric suppliers are based in Japan, China, Canada and India. The brand sources its labels and care tags are from the United States of America, and its buttons sourced from Panama.

/ The brand reports that in Japan, legislation does not allow for the dumping of fabric dyes into the rivers, slave wages, or environments that can negatively affect workers’ health.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports it is unable to trace its entire supply chain at this time, as some of its suppliers are unwilling to share this information.

/ The brand states that it works with a “Sustainability Roadmap” that has a list of details of what Glass House shirt makers is doing, what it can be doing, and using this roadmap the brand creates long term goals every quarter on how it can improve.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports it considers the social impact of its supply chain by manufacturing in United States factories, and visits these regularly, so that it knows the sewers and the environments they work in.

/ The brand considers the environmental impact when making its design choices.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports it takes into consideration, from end to end, all the people involved in the making of its shirts, and aims to make sure that they are treated with respect, and its sewers are all paid a living wage far above minimum wage. The brand talks to the sewers and assesses their contentment at its factory, and also knows that the factory managers talk with the sewers and sewer managers about hourly cost per garment.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports it tries to visit all the facilities it works with, and if it cannot, the brand puts its trust in the distributors and suppliers that they check in on manufacturers, and are empathetic towards the workers. Glass House shirt makers aims to work only with companies supplying quality products, and therefore quality of life to workers.

/ Glass House shirt makers monitors its cut and sew suppliers every 3 months.

 

/ Glass House shirt makers sells a range of products made from dead-stock materials, organic cotton, lyocell and tencel, recycled polyester and hemp.

/ The brand reports its organic cotton is dyed with low-impact dyes.

/ Glass House shirt makers uses a heavy weight cotton canvas interfacing in its shirts, as an alternative to the standard plastic based interfacings, which the brand reports will not break down through washes over time.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports that it carbon offsets all packages sent from its warehouse. The brand reuses packaging it receives to ship orders, keeps the packages as light as possible by only using the minimal packaging required and always ships via ground transportation.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports it made a conscious choice to use a font which uses 30% less ink than traditional fonts.

/ The brand uses leftover material to manufacture pocket squares or scarves as new products. All accessories are made from scrap fabrics from production of shirts.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports its long term goal is to have all of its fabrics grown, milled, spun, dyed, and woven in the United States.

/ The brand aims to provide benefits and incentives to its employees like yoga classes, communal lunches, and support in alternative modes of transportation. Eventually the brand would like to have its own manufacturing facility that runs on alternative energy such as wind, solar, & geothermal.

/ Glass House shirt makers does not publicly disclose that it is a part of any multi stakeholder initiatives to improve the social and environmental impact of its supply chain.

 

/ We don’t have any information on any corporate social responsibility initiatives the brand is a part of.

/ Glass House shirt makers is privately owned. The CEO, Daniel Bernardo, made $0 in the last financial year.

/ The brand reports that profits are evenly distributed throughout the business and that its business model is based on the Triple Bottom Line strategy.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

 

/ Glass House shirt makers sells a range of products made from deadstock materials, organic cotton, lyocell, tencel, recycled polyester and hemp.

/ Glass House shirt makers reports that it carbon offsets all packages sent from its warehouse.

/ The brand uses leftover material to manufacture pocket squares or scarves as new products. All accessories are made from scrap fabrics from production of shirts.

VOICES

HELEN MORGAN | ECOUTERRE

“They already focus on local production, using US-based vendors, suppliers and distributors to get hold of the best materials they can, including reclaimed fabric. Yet they want to push those objectives even further, to make their artisan-quality shirts from 100% organic fabrics produced, from farm to shop, right here in the US.” – 03/12/2015


 

DANIEL BERNARDO, FOUNDER | ECOUTERRE

The primary objectives for Glass House are to bridge the gap between style and sustainability. We want to offer consumers and also show other clothing companies that a product that is completely consciously designed, sourced and manufactured can be also be stylish, contemporary, cutting-edge, and have a modern appeal.”

DANIEL BERNARDO, FOUNDER | PROJECT JUST

When considering all people involved in garment making, it starts with the farmer who grows the raw fibers and ends with the customer recycling or throwing away the final product after full use. That’s a long path. Glass House takes into consideration, from end to end, all the people involved in the making of our shirts.”