DATA

Fast Retailing owns Uniqlo,  GU, Theory, PLST, Helmut Lang, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse Tam Tam and J Brand.

THE PROS:

In fiscal 2014, the percentage of employees with disabilities in the FR Group was 6.36%, the highest among companies with 5000+ employees in Japan.

Fast Retailing discloses a summary of workplace monitoring results (the grades factories received) from the last three years.

Fast Retailing runs an All Product Recycling Initiative in Uniqlo and GU stores in Japan, South Korea, UK, US, France, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Shanghai, Thailand and Malaysia. The company takes back end of life items and donates them to the UNHCR for refugees or converts them into fuel or fibre.

THE CONS:

In 2015, Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior (SACOM) published a report that cited Uniqlo for poor occupational protection and health for workers at two of its China factories.

The company does not disclose a public list of suppliers or the countries in which their suppliers are located.

It is unclear if the company can trace their entire supply chain.

 

/ Fast Retailing owns Uniqlo,  GU, Theory, PLST, Helmut Lang, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse Tam Tam and J Brand.

/ As of August 2014 Uniqlo had 1487 stores worldwide.

/ By 2012, Fast Retailing employed one person with a disability per store in Japan. In fiscal 2014, the percentage of employees with disabilities in the FR Group was 6.36%, the highest among companies with 5000+ employees in Japan.

 

/ The company does not disclose a public list of suppliers or the countries in which their suppliers are located.

/ It is unclear if the company can trace their entire supply chain.

/ Fast Retailing conducts both social audits and environmental monitoring.

/ Fast Retailing aims to collect quantitative data on the environmental impact generated by all processes in its SPA supply chain.

/ The company communicates some issues which have been discovered in their supply chain during monitoring and auditing and what they have done to resolve these issues.

/ Pre-contract monitoring is conducted to determine whether a given factory is eligible to do business with Fast Retailing.

/ Fast Retailing permits factories to use subcontractors and homeworkers as long as they report it to the company and ensure all business complies with the code of conduct. Fast Retailing does not state whether or not they monitor these subcontractors or homeworkers.

/ Fast Retailing discloses some of the violations of their code of conduct that were discovered through their monitoring program and summarises how they addressed these issues.

/ Employees and management responsible for sourcing finished goods and materials for Fast Retailing are trained and instructed regarding factory monitoring results. They are also provided with training toward raising awareness of the importance of human rights and environmental issues in supply chains.

/ In 2015, The Business of Fashion reported that hundreds of factory workers at a Chinese supplier to Fast Retailing were striking over the dismissal of some of the employees.

/ In fiscal 2014, Fast Retailing monitored 62 supplier factories that had been monitored since June 2010. The company shares a summary of the results of their environmental monitoring program including the overall compliance rate of suppliers and the steps it has taken to improve this.

/ Fast retailing discloses some of the violations of their environmental guidelines for fabric production that were discovered through their monitoring program including inadequate disposal of chemicals and waste and child labour. the company summarises how they addressed these issues.

/ Fast Retailing communicates very little about its animal welfare policies; the company does state that it has stopped sourcing mulesed wool

/ Fast Retailing have measured the carbon footprint of their headquarters, sewing and fabric manufacturers, logistics facilities and stores. There is a table outlines the number of tonnes of CO2 for each of these categories. the company has also measured the energy and raw materials used in each of these categories.

 

/ In 2011, Fast Retailing committed to eliminate the emission of hazardous chemicals from its entire product lifecycle by 2020. In 2015, the company reported on the progress it has made towards the commitment.

/ The company states that starting in 2015, it will assess the status of specific environmental impacts, decide which to focus on, and take rigorous steps to set targets and reduce those impacts.

/ In 2013, Fast Retailing committed to donate US$1 million over a five-year period to the Asian University for Women in Bangladesh.

/ Fast Retailing has established a recovery assistance fund combining ¥300 million (around US$2.5 million) from the March 2012 revenue of Uniqlo stores in Japan with donations from customers globally. The fund is assisting five NGOs in their work to promote self-reliance, job creation, and economic recovery in northeastern Japan, which was hit by the March 2011 earthquake.

/ Fast Retailing has partnered with the Grameen Bank Group and launched Grameen Uniqlo Ltd. Since 2010, Grameen UNIQLO has operated its own SPA business model to help combat poverty, develop local industry, provide employment, and support the self-sufficiency of workers in Bangladesh.

/ Fast Retailing CEO Tadashi Yanai’s estimated net worth is $20.6 billion.

/ The Business of Fashion reports that as of October 2015, Fast Retailing offered approximately a fifth of its workforce based in Japan a four day work week in order to retain full time staff, in particular women that have young families.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

/ Fast Retailing states that they are working with partner factories to improve their management capacity for more effective workplace monitoring. These efforts include requiring the appointment of on-site CSR employees and creating systems for self-auditing.

/ The Business of Fashion reports that as of October 2015, Fast Retailing offered approximately a fifth of its workforce based in Japan a four day work week in order to retain full time staff that have young families.

/ By 2012, Fashion Retailing employed one person with a disability per store in Japan. In fiscal 2014, the percentage of employees with disabilities in the FR Group was 6.36%, the highest among companies with 5000+ employees in Japan.

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