DATA

THE PROS:

The brand sells a jacket made from vegan leather materials.

The brand sells a range of products made from Tencel.

THE CONS:

The brand does not report annually on sustainability practices and progress.

The brand does not communicate the social or environmental impact of its supply chain.

The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain.

/ Lucky Brand reports it has 209 stores across America. The brand is also sold at departments stores and through the Lucky Brand website.

/ We don’t have any information on how many suppliers the brand uses, how many people the brand employs in its supply chain, lead times, the number of garments made annually, how many collections the brand releases annually, and how long its products are designed to last.

/ In May 2015, Los Angeles Times reported that Lucky Brand’s annual sales were $500 million.

 

/ It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ The brand does not publicly disclose the countries in which its suppliers are located or the supplier names and addresses.

/ The brand does not report annually on sustainability practices and progress.

/ The brand does not communicate the social or environmental impact of its supply chain.

/ PPAI reports that Lucky Brand LLC has adopted the PPAI Code of Conduct. Commitment to this Code of Conduct requires a conscientious effort on the part of the signer to aspire to be compliant with the code. It states no audits or inspections of the company would ever be required.

/ The brand states it has a social compliance programme. This program includes verification of its supply chain by means of announced and unannounced audits of its suppliers’ facilities by independent third-party auditors and Lucky Brand personnel to evaluate compliance with Lucky Brand’s policies against human trafficking and forced labor. The brand says that all Lucky Brand suppliers are required to certify that materials used in the production of Lucky Brand products comply with applicable employment and human rights laws.

/ The brand does not publicly share any policy against the use of cotton sourced from Uzbekistan in its products.

/ The brand does not publicly share any policy banning the practice of sandblasting.

/ In January 2015, the brand announced it had partnered with Candiani, a denim mill in Italy to introduce Ultra Luxe Italian Stretch denim for women. Candiani continually develops and refines new wash techniques that offer a more scientific and sustainable method of treating denim.

/ GoodGuide gave Lucky Brand an overall score of 4.6 out of 10. The brand received 4.1 for the environment category and its environmental policies, practices and performance place it among the worst 50% of companies rated by GoodGuide.

/ We don’t have any information on whether or not the brand invests in any sustainable material innovations, or if it has any animal welfare policies.

/ We don’t have any information on how the brand monitors the environmental practices of its supply chain, what levels and how much of its supply chain it monitors or how often, on any audit reports and corrective action plans, or whether or not the brand has policies in place that assist those suppliers that perform poorly on audits to improve their operations.

/ The brand sells a jacket made from vegan leather materials.

/ The brand sells a range of products made from Tencel.

 

/ The brand does not share any goals regarding how it is working to improve environmental and social conditions in its supply chain. Do you know of any?

/ The brand does not publicly disclose that it is a part of any multi stakeholder initiatives to improve the social and environmental impact of its supply chain.

 

/ Lucky Brand has a partnership with The LA Kings and Jr. Kings to support youth hockey development in the local community. The brand recently assisted the JR Kings with construction of an Education Centre.

/ In January 2015, Lucky Brand CEO Carlos Alberini announced it was re-launching the Lucky Brand Foundation, started by the brand’s founders, to help children in need. Lucky Brand is also encouraging its team to donate part of their time to help charities of their choice.

 

/ In July 2015, Rivet reported that a settlement had been reached concerning a lawsuit against Lucky Brand and 17 other brands that accused the brands of violating patents that protected RevoLaze’s laser abrasion denim technology. In accordance with the new agreement, Lucky Brand now has a non-exclusive, royalty bearing license to use RevoLaze patented technology for denim garments.

/ In April 2015, Business of Fashion reported that Lucky Brand messed up an online promotional code that allowed shoppers to buy jeans for a penny. Lucky Brand cancelled the orders and claimed that it was an employee code that was accidentally released publicly.

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO, Carlos Alberini, made in the last financial year.

/ In January 2015, the brand announced it had partnered with Candiani, a denim mill in Italy to introduce Ultra Luxe Italian Stretch denim for women. Candiani continually develops and refines new wash techniques that offer a more scientific and sustainable method of treating denim.

 

VOICES

RONALD D. WHITE | LA TIMES

“Alberini is serious about getting employees to live the company’s vision statement of “look good, feel good, do good.” Health is a big component, so “we give our employees money for joining a gym, for example,” Alberini said. On the “do good” front, Alberini points to the Lucky Brand Foundation, which company founders Gene Montesano and Barry Perlman started. “The main purpose was to help kids in need.”” – 05/30/2015

 

CARLOS ALBERINI, CEO | LOS ANGELES TIMES – 05/30/2015

“At Lucky Brand we expect everyone in our organization to do what they love with people they love. This is the first and most important principle in our culture. We believe that happiness and performance are completely interdependent.”