DATA

MUD JEANS HAS BEEN JUST APPROVED JUST SYMBOL - BLACK FOR DENIM

THE PROS:

Mud Jeans works according to the principles of the circular economy by leasing its jeans and retaining ownership of its raw materials. Under the Lease a Jean’ system the customer pays a monthly fee to lease a pair of jeans.  After 12 months the jeans are the customers to keep, alternatively they can be returned to the brand or they can be switched for a new pair. The lease includes repair services.

In some of the brands products, laser and ozone treatment is used instead of hand-brushing or chemicals. The brand aims to achieve this with all its jeans.

The brand partners with Fairtrade Max Havelaar Netherlands, which is a Dutch hallmark for fairtrade products. In other countries Max Havelaar is known as FLO.

THE CONS:

The brand does not have a publicly available Supplier Code of Conduct. However, in a correspondence with the Mud Jeans, it states that since February the brand has been participating in a SME pilot of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition to asses Mud Jeans against the HIGG index. The brand reports that this has provided it with the tools to start working on a Code of Conduct and this is one of Mud Jeans’ priorities to complete (and publish) in the coming months. The brand states that it wants to make its code workable for both the brand and its suppliers, rather than making it a ‘defense mechanism’.

 

/ Mud Jeans works according to the principles of the circular economy by leasing its jeans and retaining ownership of its raw materials. Under the Lease a Jeans’ system the customer pays a monthly fee to lease a pair of jeans.  After 12 months the jeans are the customers to keep, alternatively they can be returned to the brand or they can be switched for a new pair. The lease includes repair services.

/ Mud Jeans has 7 first and second tier suppliers.

/ We don’t have any information on how many people Mud Jeans employs in its supply chain, how many garments Mud Jeans produces a year or how many collections the brand releases annually.

/ The brand does not believe in fast-fashion and says its products are built to last a long, long time.

/ In February 2016, Mud Jeans owner, Bert van Son, told Ecotextile News the business has set itself a target of retailing one million pairs of jeans within five years’ time.

/ Mud Jeans shares the names of its first and second tier suppliers and the countries they are located in on its website.

/ Mud Jeans uses suppliers in Turkey, Tunisia, Italy and Egypt.

/ Mud Jeans shares the names of the factories involved in its denim recycling program.

/ Mud Jeans is a member of the Young Designer Programme of Fair Wear Foundation.  As part of this partnership, in 2015 the brand made available on its website, the report on the audit conducted in May 2015 by FWF on its Tunisian Factory, Yousstex. It should be noted that at the date of the audit report, this factory had not yet carried out any production for Mud Jeans.

/ On October 28, 2015 BLUEdot Register released a carbon footprint study of Mud Jeans.  The study investigated the supply chain of a pair of jeans made from denim manufactured in Egypt, with final assembly in Tunisia. The footprint included both fabric and garment shipping, and also included an estimated share of Mud Jean’s operations and business footprint based on total emissions calculated from material and energy data provided. The study showed that compared to an average pair of blue jeans:

  • A new pair of Mud Jeans had a 78% reduction in water usage.
  • A new pair of Mud Jeans had a 61% reduction in CO2 emissions.
  • A vintage pair of Mud Jeans had a 89% reduction in water usage.
  • A vintage pair of Mud Jeans had a 78% reduction in CO2 emissions.

/ The brand partners with Fairtrade Max Havelaar Netherlands, which is a Dutch hallmark for fairtrade products. In other countries Max Havelaar is known as FLO. We don’t have any other information on this partnership.

/ In a correspondence with the brand, Mud Jeans stated that approximately 90% of its products are manufactured at Yousstex International in Tunisia. Mud Jeans work very closely with the people at Yousstex and visits the factory nearly monthly. The brand’s second largest supplier ( producing the remaining 10% of Mud Jeans’ products: sweaters/knits), Salgari Srl, does its production in Italy and Tunisia. Mud Jeans states that it has also visited this supplier regularly.

/ Mud Jeans selects its manufacturers based on their ethical standards.

/ The brand does not have a publicly available Supplier Code of Conduct. However, in a correspondence with the brand, Mud Jeans states that since February it has been participating in a SME pilot of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition to asses Mud Jeans against the HIGG index. The brand reports that this has provided it with the tools to start working on a Code of Conduct and this is one of Mud Jeans’ priorities to complete (and publish) in the coming months. The brand states that it wants to make its code workable for both the brand and its suppliers, rather than making it a ‘defense mechanism’.

/ The brand does not use sandblasting on its products.

/ In a correspondence with Mud Jeans, the brand reports that its supplier, Salgari Srl, suffers from ‘audit fatigue’. To overcome this, Mud Jeans is teaming up with other FWF members to get them up to the same level of transparency as the brand’s other supplier, Yousstex.

 

/ Mud Jeans works according to the principles of the circular economy by leasing its jeans and retaining ownership of its raw materials. Under the Lease a Jeans’ system the customer pays a monthly fee to lease a pair of jeans. After 12 months the jeans are the customers to keep, alternatively they can be returned to the brand or they can be switched for a new pair. The lease includes repair services.

/ Mud Jeans cotton mills are BCI or GOTS certified.

/ In April 15, 2016 Mud Jeans announced that approximately 5,000 users had returned their jeans. The brand had upcycled approximately 2,000 pairs and made them available to customers as vintage jeans, and that the first 3,000 pairs are going to be recycled back to raw denim so it can make new pairs of jeans, which will be launched in store and online from autumn 2016.

/ The brand’s partner in garment manufacturing and laundering in Tunisia (Yousstex International) recycles 90% of the water used in the laundry, and during the washing process laser and ozone machines are used which reduce the water usage by 75%, and in some cases also reduce the use of chemicals to zero.

/ Customers can return another brand’s jeans to Mud Jeans and get a refund on their purchase of USD$11.32 (€10).

/ Mud Jeans is a certified B Corp.

/ The brand aims to use no chemicals at all.

/ The brand says if water is required, they aspire to ensure a closed circuit for 100% recycling.

/ The brand aims to produce the first carbon neutral pair of jeans.

/ The brand aims to use laser and ozone technology on all its jeans in the future.

/ The brand reports it wants to work towards a situation where it can guarantee above average living wages for the workers in the factories it works with, and that it believes working conditions and hours are well taken care of at its manufacturing partners.

 

/ The Mud team took part in the Wings for Life World Run on May 8th 2016 in Valencia, Spain.

The brand partners with MVO Netherlands, the national knowledge center and network organization for corporate social responsibility.

/ On Sunday 1st May, 2106, Mud Jeans launched The Recycle Tour. The tour travelled from Amsterdam, to Valencia, Spain, where the brand delivered 3000 pairs of jeans to its recycling factory. The Mud Jeans Recycle Tour organised various activities to promote the importance of a trash free sustainable world. Some activities included: a ‘close the loop’ tips & tricks event at Harvest Club in Antwerp, a presentation at the university of La Rochelle, and a beach clean up in Biarritz.

 

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO made in the last financial year.

/ There are no reported management scandals or issues.

 

/ Mud Jeans is the first CO2 neutral denim brand according to the BLUEdot certificate process and neutralizes its CO2 emissions through participation in BLUEdot CO2 ‘positive’ projects.

/ The brand is a founding member of the Dutch Circle Economy Foundation, also known as the Stichting Circulaire Economie, which works on implementing and promoting the principles of the circle economy.

/ Mud Jeans works according to the principles of the circular economy by leasing its jeans and retaining ownership of its raw materials. Under the Lease a Jeans’ system the customer pays a monthly fee to lease a pair of jeans. After 12 months the jeans are the customers to keep, alternatively they can be returned to the brand or they can be switched for a new pair. The lease includes repair services.

/ In April 15, 2016 Mud Jeans announced that approximately 5,000 users had returned their jeans. The brand had upcycled approximately 2,000 pairs and made them available to customers as vintage jeans, and that the first 3,000 pairs are going to be recycled back to raw denim so it can make new pairs of jeans, which will be launched in store and online from autumn 2016.

/ The brand partners with Circle Economy, a cooperative which provides insights into what a circular future might look like, and in 2013 Mud Jeans won the Circle Challenge 10×10 for its innovative fashion concept of Lease a Jeans.

 

VOICES

MARGARET BADORE | TREEHUGGER

“But the most exciting thing about Mud Jeans is that they essentially close the loop, creating a model for reducing the amount of waste associated with the apparel.” – 09/10/2014

 


HuffPo

DR. ALEXANDER HALDEMANN | HUFFINGTON POST

Amsterdam-based Mud Jeans are beyond ecological: they’re made from organic cotton; produced under fair working conditions; packaged using recycled materials; and even the labels are made out of waste-cotton and printed with ecological ink. What makes Mud Jeans unique is their flexible leasing model, taking away from typical consumerism. By allowing consumers to lease jeans for a year at under six dollars a month, Mud can recycle materials and use them for new fashion items and cut down on resources – all while helping their customers express their unique values and style as part of a larger share economy.” – 09/09/2014

We haven’t heard anything from the brand yet, check back soon for updates!