DATA

THE PROS:

DUKA produces its products in an in-house facility.

The brand ensures that all employees are paid a fair and comparable wage, which covers social security payments and government-provided healthcare.

The brand is a zero waste brand. They turn all scraps and fabric waste into patches that are used in other products or is offered to employees to use as filling for pillows and bedding.

THE CONS:

We have no cons to report currently. Have something you’d like to add? Send us an email!

/ DUKA was started with the belief that stimulating the economy is the best way to affect development and that fashion and design could, and should be, socially and ethically conscious.

/ DUKA uses traditional African textiles to make one of a kind scarves. Easy item carries a unique Swahili proverb, which the brand translates. By purchasing a scarf, you are connecting yourself to the woman in Kenya who holds the other piece of the pair.

/ The brand retails online and through 10 boutiques in the US, Australia, and Kenya.

/ The brand communicates that they give special care to each product made to ensure quality. The majority of the brand’s line is made from upcycled textiles. However, the brand sources some new fabrics for reproduction, and invests in ensuring high quality and ethics of these new textiles.

/ The brand does not wish to disclose their annual revenue.

/ The brand’s suppliers are located in Kenya.

/ The brand doesn’t wish to disclose names and addresses of its suppliersThey communicate that “due to our suppliers being located in remote villages, or with retailers we have cultivated personal relationships with over time, it’s best if we act as the source for any interested parties. Please contact jules@dukashop.com for fabric needs/partnership inquiries”

/ The brand highlights some of their tailors in a video on their website.

/ The brand shared the social impact of their supply chain through storytelling on social media and through their product tags.

/ DUKA produces its products in an in-house facility.

/ The brand states that they employ a network of women who reach deep into their village communities to seek out and purchase Kangas (the fabric). Both buyers and sellers earn money on each Kanga purchased, providing a job opportunity for women who live in an area with high poverty and unemployment.

/ The brand doesn’t audit its supply chain. Alternatively, they have on the ground presence that allows for full oversight, ensuring responsible design standards are upheld.

/ The brand adheres to standards put through by the Worldwide Responsible Accredited Production (WRAP).

/ The brand ensures that all employees are paid a fair and comparable wage, which covers social security payments and government-provided healthcare.

/ The brand uses upcycled cotton fabrics. As the brand grows its operations and begins sourcing new fabrics, they’ve committed to sourcing it from responsible factories that adhere to fair trade and ethical labor practices.

/ The brand is a zero waste brand. They turn all scraps and fabric waste into patches that are used in other products or is offered to employees to use as filling for pillows and bedding.

/ The brand uses solar power to heat water in their facility. They also keep energy use low due to line drying of items and year round sunlight.

/ The brand states that most of their fabric is delivered by foot or through public transport therefore cutting down on resources used in transport.

/ The brand provides patches to their consumers to repair their products at any point in their life cycle.

/ DUKA was started with the belief that stimulating the economy is the best way to affect development and that fashion and design could, and should be, socially and ethically conscious.

/ DUKA produces its products in an in-house facility.

/ The brand is part of the Ethical Fashion Forum and Source Network.

/ The brand is a zero waste brand. They turn all scraps and fabric waste into patches that are used in other products or is offered to employees to use as filling for pillows and bedding.

We don’t have any information to report on Duka’s community efforts, yet.

/ The brand was started by childhood friend Jules Spehar and Kate Crowley.

/ We don’t have information on CEO salary.

/ The brand works closely with all of their employees ensuring their children are receiving proper education and healthcare.

/ The brand states that they employ a network of women who reach deep into their village communities to seek out and purchase Kangas (the fabric). Both buyers and sellers earn money on each Kanga purchased, providing a job opportunity for women who live in an area with high poverty and unemployment.

VOICES

We have no quotes from the industry on Duka, yet. Check back soon, or add your voice to the conversation!

Duka, the Swahili word for shop, was founded on our belief that stimulating the economy is the best way to affect development and that fashion and design could, and should be, socially and ethically conscious. To us, DUKA means a systematic change in the way fashion is produced and consumed. We believe in slow fashion and changing consumer perception, shifting away from standards of ‘perfection’ which we feel translate as uniformity and eliminate the beauty of one of a kind products. As more and more consumers are realizing the impact of their fashion choices we are happy to offer a responsible design alternative that allows them to dress and shop well, without compromising style. – Co-founders, Kate Crowley and Jules Spehar