DATA

ABOUT THE BRAND

Matt & Nat is a vegan brand, producing a range of men and women’s bags, shoes and other accessories, with headquarters in Montreal, Canada. The brands name stands for Mat(t)erial + Nature, representing its values of not hurting animals and caring about the welfare of the planet.

HIGHLIGHTS

THE PROS:

💪🏼 Matt & Nat reports that one of the factories it works with operates to SA8000 standards. It is unclear if this factory is certified.

♻️ The brand does not have a product take back recycling program, but encourages people to upcycle their bags suggesting that, if someone hasn’t used their bag in the past 6 months, they donate it to a charity such as Dress for Success.

💡 All the brands linings are made from recycled plastic bottles. The brand reports that approximately 21 bottles are recycled for every bag it produces, which represents over 120,000 bottles every year.

THE CONS:

💪🏼 Other than the brands one SA8000 factory, we don’t have any information on if or how the brand monitors the social practices of its supply chain, or whether or not the brand has policies in place that assist those suppliers that perform poorly on audits to improve their operations.

♻️ We don’t have any information on if the brand monitors the environmental practices of its supply chain, which is concerning due to the brands use of known toxic materials such as PVC and PU.

🔍 It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ Matt & Nat is a vegan accessories brand, headquartered in Montreal, Canada. It was founded in 1995.

/ Matt & Nat products are sold in a range of stores across Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany and Australia, and through the brands online store.

/ The brand aims to design timeless and durable styles, and performs quality tests on all new styles, including subjecting them to regular use to check for wear and tear.

/ We don’t have any information on how many employees the brand has at its stores, distribution centres and head offices, how many people the brand employs in its supply chain, how many suppliers the brand uses, lead times, the number of garments made annually or how many collections the brand releases annually.

/ In September 2011, Globe and Mail reported that Matt and Nat’s revenue grew from Canadian $1-million (USD$740k) in 2003 to $10-million (USD$2.2m) in 2008, with the brands founder stating its 2011 figures were much the same.

/ Matt & Nat states that it designs and produces its own custom hardware. We don’t have any further information on this.

/ The brand’s bags are made in small factories in China, which it states it has long-standing relationships with.

/ It is unclear if the brand can trace its entire supply chain.

/ Other than manufacturing in China, the brand does not publicly disclose the countries in which its suppliers are located or the supplier’s names and addresses.

The brand does not communicate the social or environmental impact of its supply chain.

/ The brand does not report annually on sustainability practices and progress.

/ The brand does not have a publicly available supplier Code of Conduct.

/ Matt & Nat reports that one of the factories it works with operates to SA8000 standards, which is a self managed, auditable certification standard that encourages organizations to develop, maintain, and apply social standards based on ILO and UN conventions. It is unclear if this factory is certified to the standard.

/ Matt & Nat reports that it visits each of its factories and works to build strong relationships with the owners.

/ The brand does not have a publicly available policy against the use of unauthorised subcontracting.

We don’t have any information on how much the workers in the brands supply chain are paid, or if it is working towards a living wage.

/ Other than the brands one SA8000 factory, we don’t have any information on how the brand addresses child labour, how the brand addresses forced and compulsory labour, how the brand addresses freedom of association, how the brand addresses collective bargaining rights, how the brand addresses discrimination, how the brand addresses regular excessive overtime, how the brand addresses freedom of movement for workers at supplier facilities, whether or not supplier recruitment fees are prohibited and how the brand addresses unsafe work conditions.

/ Matt & Nat states that it uses vegan leathers in its production including PU (polyurethane) and PVC (polyvinylchloride). The brand opts for PU where possible due to its less harmful environmental impact.

/ All the brands linings are made from recycled plastic bottles. The brand reports that approximately 21 bottles are recycled for every bag it produces, which represents over 120,000 bottles every year.

/ The brand also uses recycled nylon, recycled polyester canvas, cork, and rubber in its products. In the past Matt & Nat states it has experimented with other materials including cardboard and recycled bicycle tyres.

/ We don’t have any information on if the brand uses renewable energy at any stage of its supply chain, if the brand has measured its greenhouse gas emissions for its supply chain what the brand is doing to reduce its water use in its supply chain, policies in place to limit the use of hazardous chemicalspolicies in place to reduce pollution and resources used for transport, sustainable packaging policies, policies and strategies the brand has to manage waste and recycling during production or strategies the brand has in place to manage overstock.

/ The brand does not have a product take back recycling program, but encourages people to upcycle their bags suggesting that, if someone hasn’t used their bag in the past 6 months, they donate it to a charity such as Dress for Success.

We don’t have any information on if the brand monitors the environmental practices of its supply chain.

In March 2016, The Guardian reported that the brand had used a new biobased PU polyurethane leather for its Loom collection.

/ In July 2014, Oeko Textiles reported that Greenpeace ranked Polyvinyl Chloride PVC as the single most environmentally damaging type of plastic because its production release dioxins and persistent organic pollutants, and that while Polyurethane PU doesn’t have quite the same toxicity problems as PVC, plenty of CO2 is emitted during its production, and neither version is traditionally considered biodegradable.

/ The brand states that it would like to make SA8000 certified factories a bigger part of its production in the future. We don’t have any information on if or how it is working towards this goal.

/ The brand does not publicly disclose that it is a part of any multi stakeholder initiatives to improve the social and environmental impact of its supply chain.

 

/ Matt & Nat launched its HOPE Charity campaign for the second time in 2016, following the success of the campaign in 2015. In its first year, the campaign raised just under Canadian $70,000 (approx. US$52,000) for 5 charities, through the sales of a bag designed for the campaign. Matt & Nat shares information on the 4 charities who will benefit from the latest HOPE campaign.

 

/ We don’t have any information on how much the CEO, Manny Kohli, made in the last financial year.

/ In September 2011, Globe and Mail reported that Matt and Nat founder, Inder Bedi, took on Manny Kohil as a business partner in 2001 as he was looking for financial backing and additional experience with manufacturing in Asia, in order to grow the business.

/ In February 2015, UO Behind the Brand reported that Manny Kohil had subsequently taken over as president and owner of Matt & Nat. It is unclear what year this occurred.

 

/ Matt & Nat is a vegan brand that has experimented with a some more sustainable materials, including recycled bottles, nylons, cardboard, rubber & cork. It states it has also recently introduced recycled bicycle tyres into its supply chain, however we could not find any products made from this on its website.

/ Since 2007, the brand has been committed to using linings only made out of 100% recycled plastic bottles.

VOICES

ROSIE KELWAY | VIVA

“Matt & Nat — which stands for material and nature — is a Canadian-based eco-friendly and vegan accessory brand putting considerable effort into helping the cause. Instead of leather they use sustainable materials such as cork, rubber, nylons, cardboard and even bicycle tyres; with the lining of their bags made entirely of recycled plastic bottles.” – 08/04/2016


 

MANNY KOHLI, CEO | FASHION GLOBE MAGAZINE

We want to recognise that Matt and Nat is a company that people are proud of. We don’t care if the company makes $30 or $40 million. We care more about the quality and we want to stand for quality.”